Budva The Disappointing Jewel of Montenegro


This post may contain affiliate links. Please read our disclosure for more information.

Budva the disappointing jewel of Montenegró.  It is not often, actually, this is the first time, that we have been disappointed with a destination.

After being in Kotor for a week we decided that we needed to see more of Montenegro, a country that had impressed us so much so far. We had read that Budva situated on the Budva Riviera had a nickname of “Montenegrin Miami” and was the most crowded and popular tourist destination in Montenegro.  Alarm bells should have gone off when we were chatting to a Russian couple at our accommodation in Kotor who looked horrified when we said our next destination was Budva.

Where is Montenegro

Budva The Disappointing Jewel of Montenegro

Montenegró  sits between the 2 coastal Balkan countries of Albania and Bosnia Herzegovina and has inland borders with Macedonia, Serbia and Kosovo. The capital is Podgorica.

Map of Montenegro

Budva the disappointing jewel in Montenegro

Map Image Courtesy of World Maps

Why was Budva the disappointing jewel of Montenegro?

Budva – First Impressions – a Concrete Jungle

A stunning rocky coastline with azure blue seas greeted us 20 minutes after leaving Kotor. We could see in the distance parts of the Stari Grad (Old Town) but what were all those cranes doing and those modern concrete hotels and apartment blocks blocking the views to the Stari Grad.

Luckily, we had given our taxi driver from Kotor the contact number for the owner of the ‘Apartment Old Town‘ which we had booked through booking.com, he had to call a couple of times to find out the directions. There was no way that we would have found it on our own with our distinct lack of the local language.  The Apartment was newly renovated with amazing views over to the harbor to the left of the Stari Grad, and a balcony that beckoned for cold beers to be enjoyed on.  A pathway in front of the building led down to the Stari Grad just a 5-minute walk away, but we could not see the famous Church Tower due to the concrete monsters.

Budva – Second Impressions – Beaches Packed Like Sardines

Budva Stari Grad

View of Stari Grad

After settling into a new location we like to wander out and explore.  Leaving the Old Town to a later adventure we turned left and followed the pathway past the marina and onto the Budva beach.

What a shock!

Budva beach was packed, sunbeds lined up row after row, no space in between and umbrellas precariously positioned to shade the loungers from the hot afternoon sun.  Loud music blared out from speakers every few yards, cheap bars and takeaway food outlets fought for the tourist’s euros.  Normally, by now we would have taken some photos, but there was just not anything worth taking.  You could say that we were a little more than shocked!

Did we have a Plan B? No.

We had booked for 5 nights and then we were due in Dubrovnik.  On our return, we found the local green market and 3 supermarkets that were all in walking distance from our apartment, at least we had choice and variety for self-catering.

Did Budva redeem itself? Sunrises, a beach and Stari Grad

Budva Sunrise

Sunrise over Budva

Sometimes, it just takes a night or two to settle into a new location.  The view from the balcony over the marina was stunning, especially at sunrise as the sun rose to the left of the building.  The sun set behind us and more concrete buildings blocked this view, but at this time of the night, the harbor was busy with small charter boats returning and the action more than compensated for the lack of a sunset.

Church of St Sava The Anointed

Church of St Sava the Anointed Budva

Church of St Sava the Anointed

Constructed during the 12th Century the Church sits proudly on the water’s edge of the Stari Grad.  When Budva was under the Venetian reign the Church held both Catholic and Orthodox services.  Recent renovations have uncovered remnants of ancient frescos on the church’s walls.

Holy Trinity Church

Budva Holy Trinity Church

Holy Trinity Church Budva

The Orthodox population of Budva supported by the Bishop of Montenegro requested the construction of the Church after the demise of the Venetian reign during 1797, it was completed in 1804.  The bell loft contains 3 bells and a dome.

The Church of St John

Budva Church of St John

Church of St John

Originally constructed in the 7th Century the Church of St John is one of the oldest churches on the Budva Riviera. In 1667 it was damaged by an earthquake that struck the area.  In 1828 it became a cathedral.  The Church’s Bell Tower dominates the Stari Grad and the Church itself is the tallest building in the Old Town.

Dancing Girl Statue – legend or fact

Budva Statue of the Dancing Girl

Dancing Girl Statue

On the way to one of the nicest beaches in Budva the pathway passes a statue of a topless girl doing a yoga pose.  Some say it is a statue of a girl who drowned here and others say it is just a statue.  What do you think?  Whatever anyone thinks it is a great location to take a photo of the Walls of the Stari Grad.

Mogren Beach

Mogren Beach Budva

Mogren Beach

The beaches to the right of the Stari Grad are so much nicer than those we mentioned before to the left of the marina.  A 5-minute walk along the pathway past the Dancing Girl Statue you will arrive at Mogren Beach 1 which can be quite busy during the height of the summer.  If you continue further along you will reach Mogren Beach 2 – a much quieter and more sedate area to relax and swim.

So did Budva redeem itself?

Budva Stari Grad

Cafes inside the walls of the Stari Grad

The few sites mentioned above did allow Budva to redeem itself at first but as we wandered deeper inside the walls of the Stari Grad we grew more disappointed. The owner of our Apartment had informed us that Budva’s Old Town was so much better than Kotor’s.  We disagree with him definitely on this point.

Budva Stari Grad

Typical street view inside the walls of the Stari Grad

Once inside the walls, there were a plethora of souvenir shops, cafes and restaurants, it lacked the atmosphere of Kotor and felt tacky.

One final disappointment to top it all off – Sveti Stefan

When you Google Budva one of the scenic shots is that of Sveti Stefan. An island with a small causeway leading to 5th-century red-roofed stone houses. It was quite easy to get to from Budva town by bus for a few euros but when we Googled the bus timetable we uncovered something sinister.  Not only sinister in history but sinister in this day and age.  Originally the island sheltered the locals from the attacks from pirates and the forces of the Turks.  Eventually, in 1954 the Communist Party removed the remaining 20 local inhabitants and 3 years later it was turned into an exclusive resort which was frequented by many famous people.  During the Yugoslav Federation breakdown in the 1990’s, it fell into decline.

In 2007 Aman Resorts from Singapore were successful in winning the lease and closed the island to all but its own exclusive guests.  If you are not a guest the only way of getting onto the island is if you have booked a table at one of the Resort’s very expensive restaurants or you can hire a sunbed on one of the beaches at the entrance to the causeway for 50 euros per person per day. That is not a typo – 50 euros per day per sun bed.

If you are interested in staying in Budva check out some hotel reviews from Tripadvisor.

If you are thinking of traveling to Kotor in Montenegro you may like to read our two blog posts:

We went 360Monte to North Montenegro Tour

Kotor’s City Walls Only 1,350 Steps to the Top 

What you need to know about Kotor

Where we stayed in Montenegro:

Kotor: Old Mariner Guest House

Budva: Apartment Old Town

Hotels Montenegro:

Tripadvisor has a range of hotels in all regions of Montenegro with the latest prices and availability.

For more information on hotels in Budva Montenegro with the latest reviews, prices and availability click here.

Things to do in Montenegro:

There are many things to do in Montenegro from cruises to National Parks.

Where to eat in Budva:

There are a variety of restaurants, cafes and bars in Budva to suit all budgets and tastes.

Montenegro Currency:

Montenegro uses the Euro.

Montenegro Airport:

For a list of airports in Montenegro click here.

For Further Information on Montenegro, we recommend the Lonely Planet Montenegro.


THIS POST CONTAINS AFFILIATE LINKS.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *